Mobility Scooters

If you are looking to purchase your first mobility scooter, or are looking to upgrade your current model, we have put together a useful guide to ensure you find the perfect scooter.

In this article, we will explore the different types of mobility scooter, as well as the rules and legal obligations. We also have useful advice to help you save on the cost of your mobility scooter and check if you are eligible for VAT relief.

Mobility Scooter

Mobility scooters are an extremely popular choice in the UK for people with reduced mobility or a disability that impairs walking. They come in a range of different styles and designs, ensuring they will fit each person’s budget and unique requirements. Our helpful guide will help explain everything you need to know about electric mobility scooters.

Types of Mobility Scooter

There are many different types of mobility scooter available for sale in the UK, with each type having pros and cons that should be considered before making a purchase.

Mobility scooters are generally categorised by either the maximum speed that they travel (eg. 8mph) or the primary function (eg. folding mobility scooter). In some cases, both the speed and function are combined, such as with 4mph pavement mobility scooters.

Below we will explain the different types of mobility scooters available in the UK. We have also included helpful price guides so that you can choose the right mobility scooter for your needs and budget.

Types of Mobility Scooter

There are many different types of mobility scooter available for sale in the UK, with each type having pros and cons that should be considered before making a purchase.

Mobility scooters are generally categorised by either the maximum speed that they travel (eg. 8mph) or the primary function (eg. folding mobility scooter). In some cases, both the speed and function are combined, such as with 4mph pavement mobility scooters.

Below we will explain the different types of mobility scooters available in the UK. We have also included helpful price guides so that you can choose the right mobility scooter for your needs and budget.

Mobility scooters are an extremely popular choice in the UK for people with reduced mobility or a disability that impairs walking. They come in a range of different styles and designs, ensuring they will fit each person’s budget and unique requirements. Our helpful guide will help explain everything you need to know about electric mobility scooters.

 

Types of Mobility Scooter

There are many different types of mobility scooters available for sale and hire in the UK. When it comes to buying a mobility scooter, there are a range of choices available, each with differing functions and price ranges.

One of the main characteristics that categorises different types of mobility scooters available is the speed at which they travel. The most common speeds available include 4mph, 6mph and 8mph models.

The purpose of each mobility scooter is another way they are frequently categorised. Some of the uses include Pavement Scooters, Travel Scooters and Off-Road (all-terrain) mobility scooters.

As they are a large purchase, it is a good idea to ensure you do some research to find the ideal mobility scooter for your needs and budget. Our guide below will go into more depth for each of the types available in the UK, as well as some other important tips, information and frequently asked questions.

Travel & Folding Mobility Scooters

Folding mobility scooters, also commonly known as collapsible, travel, boot or compact mobility scooters, are models that can be disassembled and easily transported. This type of mobility scooter is ideal for customers who want the convenience of taking their own scooter in the car, or even abroad on holiday.

As well as being light and easy to transport, they are also normally one of the cheapest types of mobility scooter available, with base models starting at a few hundred pounds.

However, as they are designed to be lightweight and compact, they often lack many of the features found on other scooters. Some of the common limitations on these travel and foldable models include reduced battery life and range, slower speeds, limited storage space, reduced suspension and less comfortable seats. Popular safety features, such as headlights and mirrors, are also less common on most travel scooters.

 

4 mph Pavement Mobility Scooters

As their name suggests, these scooters are designed for pavement use. To ensure the safety of all footpath users, mobility scooters should not exceed 4 mph when driven on pavements. As they can only be driven on pavements and pedestrianised areas, these scooters do not need to be registered with the DVLA.

4 mph scooters are generally classed as mid-sized, and are perfect for smaller trips, such as to the shops. The smaller size and lower speed makes them easier to control, and they are ideal for crowded spaces.

They have a smaller battery than bigger scooters, and typically have a range from 10 – 25 miles, making them better suited to shorter trips. Prices for 4mph pavement scooters generally starts at around £350.

 

6-8 mph Mobility Scooters

Scooters that are classified in the 6-8 mph category are normally larger, faster and have improved range (often 30+ miles). These scooters are often the most expensive, and come equipped with a wide range of inclusions. Common features of 6-8 mph mobility scooters include lockable storage compartments, headlights and tail lights, comfortable and supportive seats, wing mirrors, horn, and much more.

These scooters can be driven on certain roads, but also must be registered at the DVLA. As they can be driven on roads, they are often referred to as ‘road mobility scooters’. 6-8 mph mobility scooters can only be used on roads if they have been taxed and registered with the DVLA.

6-8 mph mobility scooters are commonly referred to as ‘Class 3 Scooters’, as this is the classification given by the department of transport. Drivers must be aged over 14 to drive a scooter capable of more than 4 mph. All scooters are restricted to a maximum speed limit of 4 mph when driven on pavements.

All Terrain Mobility Scooters

Mobility Scooters For Sale

Mobility Scooters For Hire

Choosing the right mobility scooter

Mobility Scooter Accessories

When buying a new or used mobility scooter, there are a great range of accessories available to further enhance your experience. Below are some of the most popular accessories in the UK.

Cushions

Cushions are a popular accessory, and also one of the cheapest. They can provide added comfort, support and height, ensuring you have better experience on your scooter. Round pillows can also be used to provide support and relieve pressure.

Wet Weather Equipment

There is a lot of great wet weather equipment available for mobility scooters. Some of the most popular items include canopies, garages, and wet weather clothing. These items are not only great for keeping you dry and warm, but also help to protect your scooter from the elements.

Canopies

Mobility scooter canopies offer users a range of benefits, from shelter to added security. Canopies are great when the weather conditions are less than desirable, as they provide protection from wind and rain, which helps keep users dry and warm. There is also shade from the sun, and the side curtains can be rolled up to allow a breeze on warmer days.

Canopies also help provide added security, as some can be locked, helping protect items inside, as well as the scooter itself. However, we strongly recommend you never leave anything valuable in your mobility scooter.

Scooter Canopies generally cost from around £350 to £550.

Rigid and Folding Garages

A small garage for your mobility scooter is a great way of ensuring it is kept dry and away from the elements. There are a range of different options available, with folding garages being one of the best and most popular options. They take up minimal room, are easy to install, and make it easy to cover and protect your mobility scooter.

Scooter Clothing

If you do not want to be enclosed by a canopy, but ensure you are prepared if rain suddenly strikes, mobility scooter clothing is a great solution. When not in use, they can be folded away into a compact space on your scooter, and are quick and easy to put on when needed. There are 3 main types of scooter clothing available, including:

Full Body Clothing – covers your scooter, as well as yourself, ensuring everything remains dry whilst you carry on your journey.

Lower Body Clothing – covers your lower body, keeping your lap and legs warm and dry.

Upper Body Clothing – covers you from the head down, keeping you out of the rain.

 

Ramps

Ramps are a popular accessory commonly purchased with mobility scooters. Below are the most common types of mobility scooter ramps available.

Standard & Folding: One of the most common types of ramps, these ramps are available in a range of different lengths and can be used for a range of inclines. Portable varieties can often be folded in half, allowing for easier transportation.

Threshold: These are ramps that are used to assist users over smaller obstacles, such as a doorway threshold leading into and out of a building. They generally only very small, allowing non-wheelchair users to step over them.

Channel: These ramps are usually used in pairs for wheelchairs and mobility scooters, as each of the front and back wheels fits into it’s own channel. They are thin, light and take up less space than standard ramps, and are commonly used for loading into the boot of cars and vehicles.

When buying a ramp, it is important to ensure it is long enough to cover the gap required, and also strong enough to support the weight of your mobility scooter.

Alarms

A great way of protecting your mobility scooter is with an alarm. There are several types available, with most costing between £25 to £50. The most common type of alarm operates by sensing motion or vibration, at which time it emits a loud sound to alert the owner. The alarm is normally activated and deactivated by a small remote, which can be attached to keys, similar to a car alarm remote.

Replacement Batteries

If your scooter is a few years old, and has experienced heavy use, you may want to consider a replacement battery. A new battery can help increase the speed and range of your scooter, as well as charging better. Depending on the use of your scooter, batteries tend to last between 18-months to 3 years.

The cost of batteries does vary depending on the type of scooter you have, with most batteries ranging from as low as £20 through to more than £100. Smaller scooters, such as foldable models, require smaller batteries, which cost less, whilst larger and faster mobility scooters require more power and larger batteries, which cost more.

Chargers

From time to time, you may need to replace your charger. It is not uncommon for scooter chargers to last for the life of a scooter, but sometimes they may need to be replaced. It is important to choose the right charger for your scooter, as plugs and power outputs can vary between manufacturers. Most replacement chargers cost between £40 to £70.

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Insurance & Warranty

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Top Mobility Scooter Brands

Shoprider

CareCo

Rascal

Sterling

KYMCO

TGA

Pride Mobility

Drive

Roma Medical

Used Mobility Scooters

Mobility Scooters vs Electric Wheelchairs

There is often some confusion between mobility scooters and electric wheelchairs. They are both legally classed as ‘invalid carriages’, and provide the same general function of mobilising the user between locations. However, there are also significant differences, as we will explain below.

Mobility scooters and powerchairs are available in both class 2 and class 3. Class 2 carriages are restricted to a speed limit of 4 mph, and these scooters are commonly referred to as ‘pavement mobility scooters’. Class 3 invalid carriages can travel up to a speed of 8 mph, and are permitted on roads, if registered with the DVLA. Class 3 carriages cannot exceed 4 mph when travelling on pavements and pedestrianised areas.

 

How much does a mobility scooter cost?

Should I Buy or Rent a Mobility Scooter?

Do I need Mobility Scooter Insurance?

When it comes to most types of insurance

Generally, scooters are a large purchase, with many models costing thousands of pounds. Insurance can help ease

Read our full article on mobility scooter insurance here.

Cheap Mobility Scooters

The cost of buying a mobility scooter generally starts at around £400, with deluxe models costing more than several thousand pounds. Fortunately, there are a few ways to save money and find a cheap mobility scooter for your needs.

The cheapest mobility scooters for sale tend to be travel or collapsible scooters. Whilst these do have their benefits, they also have their drawbacks. They are made to be light, which means they often lack high-capacity batteries, powerful motors and comfortable seating.

How to save money and get a great deal:

Take advantage of VAT Relief. If you are eligible for a VAT exemption, you will not have to pay VAT on your purchase. This will make your scooter 20% cheaper.

Consider Second Hand. Buying a used mobility scooter is a great way of saving some extra money. There are a number of used scooter specialists around the UK, many of whom refurbish the equipment and even provide a warranty for your peace of mind.

Hunt Around. A great way of finding a fantastic deal for your preferred model is to check multiple retailers. Prices vary between stores, so make some phone calls or look online to find the cheapest price.

Ask for a discount. Whilst it may seem that prices for scooters are fixed, many retailers can be flexible on the prices. Just like when you are buying a car, ask if they can reduce the price any further.

Trade-in your old scooter. If you have an old scooter, you can save on your new purchase with a part-exchange. However, not all stores offer this service, so you may need to do some research to find one near you.

Shop during sales. Just like most other shops, mobility scooter stores do often have sales, where you can save big on the cost of your mobility equipment.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some of the most frequently asked questions we receive, along with some helpful and informative answers. Simply click on the questions below to reveal the answers. If you have a question that we have missed, please do not hesitate to contact our friendly expert team.

 

 

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Yes, certain types of mobility scooters are allowed on the road. Class 3 mobility scooters can be driven on certain types of road, but they must be registered with the DVLA. You do not need to pay anything to register your scooter.

Class 3 scooters can travel faster than 4 mph, with a maximum speed of 8 mph on roads. They are not allowed on motorways, and lights must be used when driving at night.

You can drive a class 2 scooter on a road only when there is no access to a footpath.

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According to UK law, you can only drive a mobility scooter or powered wheelchair if you:

 – have trouble walking because of an injury, physical disability or medical condition

 – are demonstrating the vehicle before it is sold

 – are training a disabled user

 – are taking the vehicle to or from maintenance or repair

 

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The weight of each type of scooter depends on its purpose and feature. For example, a travel mobility scooter is designed to be light and easy to pack away, whereas a class 3 scooter will be larger and heavier, with a bigger battery and motor.

There are limitations to how heavy a mobility scooter can be when unladen. Class 2 scooters must not be heavier than 113.4 kg, and class 3 scooters must not exceed 150 kg.

Some travel scooters are as light as 15 kilograms, whilst larger 8 mph scooters can weigh as much as 150kg.

 

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Yes, to drive a class 3 mobility scooter you must be 14 years or older. There is no upper age limit, but users should be competent. It is also recommended that drivers have sufficient eyesight, and can read a car registration number from 40 feet (12.3m).

For class 2 scooters, there are no age restrictions.

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You do not need a licence to drive a mobility scooter, but there are some restrictions that you should be aware of. Class 3 mobility scooters can only be driven by users older than 14, and can only be driven on roads when they have been registered with the DVLA. Class 2 mobility scooters can only be driven on pavements, unless there is no pavement available.

On pavements, all scooters must not exceed a 4mph speed limit, and Class 3 mobility scooters cannot exceed 8mph on roads.

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You do not need to pay vehicle tax on mobility scooters, but class 3 scooters must be registered with the DVLA. Your registration must remain current whilst you own and use the scooter. Even if you buy a used mobility scooter, you are still required to register it with the DVLA. There is no cost to register.

Find out more about taxing and registering mobility scooters here.

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VAT Relief allows those with a disability or long-term illness to be exempt from paying VAT on certain products used for domestic or personal use. If a product or aid was designed or adapted for a disability, it will normally qualify for VAT exemption. As such, mobility scooters exempt from VAT.

Most mobility scooter retailers will display prices without VAT, which will allow you to understand the cost you will have to pay if you are eligible for a VAT exemption.

If you meet any of the following criteria, you can claim VAT relief:

  • you have a physical or mental impairment which has a long-term and substantial adverse effect upon your ability to carry out everyday activities
  • you have a condition that the medical profession treats as a chronic illness, such as rheumatoid arthritis
  • you are terminally ill

Unfortunately, you do not qualify for the VAT exemption is you are elderly but able-bodied, or if you are temporarily disabled.

Find out more about VAT Relief.

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It is not a legal requirement to take out mobility scooter insurance, but it can be recommended. Accidents can happen, both whilst using your scooter on roads and in pedestrianised areas. If you have an accident, and are at fault, you may be liable for any damages to people or property.

It is up to each individual to decide whether insurance is right for them. Insurance normally starts at around £40 per year, and many packages include breakdown cover and theft protection.

Read more about mobility scooter insurance here.

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Yes, certain types of mobility scooters are allowed on the road. Class 3 mobility scooters can be driven on certain types of road, but they must be registered with the DVLA. You do not need to pay anything to register your scooter.

Class 3 scooters can travel faster than 4 mph, with a maximum speed of 8 mph on roads. They are not allowed on motorways, and lights must be used when driving at night.

You can drive a class 2 scooter on a road only when there is no access to a footpath.

According to UK law, you can only drive a mobility scooter or powered wheelchair if you:

– have trouble walking because of an injury, physical disability or medical condition

– are demonstrating the vehicle before it is sold

– are training a disabled user

– are taking the vehicle to or from maintenance or repair

The weight of each type of scooter depends on its purpose and feature. For example, a travel mobility scooter is designed to be light and easy to pack away, whereas a class 3 scooter will be larger and heavier, with a bigger battery and motor.

There are limitations to how heavy a mobility scooter can be when unladen. Class 2 scooters must not be heavier than 113.4 kg, and class 3 scooters must not exceed 150 kg.

Some travel scooters are as light as 15 kilograms, whilst larger 8 mph scooters can weigh as much as 150kg.

Yes, to drive a class 3 mobility scooter you must be 14 years or older. There is no upper age limit, but users should be competent. It is also recommended that drivers have sufficient eyesight, and can read a car registration number from 40 feet (12.3m).

For class 2 scooters, there are no age restrictions.

You do not need a licence to drive a mobility scooter, but there are some restrictions that you should be aware of. Class 3 mobility scooters can only be driven by users older than 14, and can only be driven on roads when they have been registered with the DVLA. Class 2 mobility scooters can only be driven on pavements, unless there is no pavement available.

On pavements, all scooters must not exceed a 4mph speed limit, and Class 3 mobility scooters cannot exceed 8mph on roads.

VAT Relief allows those with a disability or long-term illness to be exempt from paying VAT on certain products used for domestic or personal use. If a product or aid was designed or adapted for a disability, it will normally qualify for VAT exemption. As such, mobility scooters exempt from VAT.

Most mobility scooter retailers will display prices without VAT, which will allow you to understand the cost you will have to pay if you are eligible for a VAT exemption.

If you meet any of the following criteria, you can claim VAT relief:

  • you have a physical or mental impairment which has a long-term and substantial adverse effect upon your ability to carry out everyday activities
  • you have a condition that the medical profession treats as a chronic illness, such as rheumatoid arthritis
  • you are terminally ill

Unfortunately, you do not qualify for the VAT exemption is you are elderly but able-bodied, or if you are temporarily disabled.

Find out more about VAT Relief.

It is not a legal requirement to take out mobility scooter insurance, but it can be recommended. Accidents can happen, both whilst using your scooter on roads and in pedestrianised areas. If you have an accident, and are at fault, you may be liable for any damages to people or property.

It is up to each individual to decide whether insurance is right for them. Insurance normally starts at around £40 per year, and many packages include breakdown cover and theft protection.

Read more about mobility scooter insurance here.